Hip Hop / News

Kanye West Scoffs At NFTs: “I’m Not On That Wave I Make Music”

Kanye West

Kanye West says he’s not interested in creating a Non-Fungible Token, becoming one of the few artists not jumping on the NFT movement.

The Yeezy billionaire has been very active on Instagram when not out on hot dates with Julia Fox. He’s now giving his opinion on relevant topics.

Kanye West, who is regarded as a creative genius and savvy businessman, doesn’t think NFTs are all they are chalked up to be and shot down inquiries about his business getting into NFTS.

“STOP ASKING ME TO DO NFT’s I’M NOT FINNA CO-SIGN,” he wrote. “FOR NOW I’M NOT ON THAT WAVE I MAKE MUSIC AND PRODUCTS IN THE REAL WORLD.”

Kanye West also shared a handwritten note about his decision. “My focus is on building real products in the real world, real food, real clothes, real shelter,'” he said. “Do not ask me to do a fu**ing NFT.”

However, it seems he’s not entirely ruling out getting into the digital craze in the future. “Ask me later,” the note ended.

NFTs are tokens that offer digital ownership of select copyright pieces of artist works. Among the people who have bought into the craze is Eminem who bought a $462,000 ape NFT that resembles the rapper himself. The Ape series has seen people like Travis Scott and Justin Bieber dropping big bags on the NFTs. Bieber spent a cool $1.29 million on his Bored Ape Yacht Club NFT.

Meanwhile, Kanye has been generating a lot of publicity for his album DONDA 2, which Future is executive producing. The album is set for release on Feb. 22, and the rapper said via Instagram that he wouldn’t be available for the phone.

“I don’t have a phone until 2.22.22,” he said. “My focus is taking my kids to school and finishing the album.”

The album is a sophomore to the first album of the same name released last year September. As for the new album, Ye’s collaborator Digital Nas revealed that the album is aiming to be one of the most memorable projects for the artist.

“These are the directives for the album: ‘If it cannot be played at a funeral, childbirth, graduation, a wedding, it will not be on our record,'” said Nas. “We learned a lot from DONDA 1. We learned what hit. We learned what was sticking. So we took from there. It has to be able to be played at four major moments in people’s lives,” he said.