Dancehall / Feature / News

Everton Blender Feels Good About French Montana’s “Ghetto People Song” Sample

Everton Blender French Montana

Everton Blender feels thankful for the recognition he has received from French Montana and Harry Fraud sample of his classic “Ghetto People Song.”

A persistent problem that continues to haunt the dancehall genre is the lack of respect it receives on the world stage, especially regarding samples. The problem was once again highlighted by conscious dancehall veteran Everton Blender who recently revealed that even though his track “Ghetto People Song” was sampled by French Montana, he has not received any payment.

The track, which is still played in many Caribbean parties during conscious reggae segments, came out about 26 years ago and, to this date, remains a fan favorite. The track in question, “Higher” by French Montana and American producer Harry Fraud was released yesterday, June 27.

Throughout the track, Everton Blender’s unique vocals are featured. The track is the lead single from Montega, the duo’s joint album, which was recently released. Blender’s track was in the heyday of riddims and is on the Lalibela rhythm, which was released in 1996 and was produced by Tony Rebel for Flames Productions.

Blender made the revelation about his track being sampled and not receiving his dues to the Jamaica Observer. While he admitted that he is quite impressed that his music was used, he believes that he should have been given some credit.

“Mi feel real good ’cause wi neva did a get di right recognition, but now it gone to a different level. One thing dem shoulda sey is ‘featuring Everton Blender’, but otherwise mi feel good,” he added.

Staying true to his beliefs, he said he holds no animosity towards the artists but still thinks he should rightfully get the financial compensation he is due. He also revealed that his lawyer was currently looking at the situation to see how it could be resolved.

The rhythm in question was highly regarded by the Rastafarian community throughout the Caribbean at a time when the sub-genre of conscious dancehall was blooming. The other tracks on the project were also appreciated, including Tony Rebel’s “If Jah Is Standing by my Side” and “Are You Satisfied” by Ras Shiloh.”

The “Blow Your Nose” artist co-wrote the track along with Tony Rebel and Steve Lindo. The Jamaica Football Federation also used the song during the Reggae Boyz’ home matches in the year that they created history and qualified for the 1998 World Cup in France.

Recently another veteran in the conscious dancehall arena, Junior Reid, also revealed that he did not really make anything off his 2006 collab with The Game, titled “It’s Okay (One Blood).” A track that, just as in Blender’s case, was heavily sampled. That track which came out in 1998, was the lead single for The Game’s album Doctor’s Advocate.

Reid made the revelation while being interviewed on Math Hoffa’s podcast. He also said he doesn’t hold it against The Game because he knows management usually controls behind the scenes. However, he added that he contributed significantly to the song and made way less than the rapper.

In his case, he seemed to be outwitted out of the royalties as he added, “And at the end of the day, mainly why dem want mi come come sing that, maybe they want to get around the sample, meck it look like is a new record. But is not a new record. Is the same original sample.”