Dancehall, News

Spice Campaign To Lift Ban On Jamaican ‘Bad Words’ In Dancehall Rejected By Senator & Fans

Spice dancehall artiste

Spice campaign to end the ban on Jamaican classic “bad words” hit a dead end with at least one senator and some dancehall fans.

Some very annoyed Jamaican women are labeling Spice as hypocritical and self-serving, following her recent video beseeching Prime Minister Andrew Holness to embrace Jamaican profanities, such as B*mboclaat, which she was able to use proudly in Belgium at a music festival of the same name. The comments came after President of the Senate Tom Tavares-Finson told The Observer newspaper that the Belgians who organized the B**b*clat Music Festival, during which Spice made her call, were ignorant of the meaning of the word. He was certain that if they knew the word meant a sanitary napkin, they would not have given it that name.

Readers poured scorn on the self-proclaimed Queen of the Dancehall accusing her of being a pretender as she would not want her children to use profanities.

“Spice is being a hypocrite. She wouldn’t want her kids saying these words yet she wants the government to legalize it?! So it would be ok for kids to go around singing n cussing? Are u going to disregard our morals just because some tourists like it?” Jodi Ann wrote.

“If Spice want to teach her children to cuss bad words, she go ahead and do so, but stop with her rubbish,” she added.

“Can you imagine she telling her children about dem BBC and dem telling her back? Because if the government legalize it, everybody have the rights to cuss it because it would be the law, unuh nuh c that there’s nothing about her but slackness,” Latoya Sweetie wrote in her castigation of the 36 year old, while Pachoy Seal declared: “Tell Spice to use that word in a sentence to her children!”

Some persons argued that Spice was not representing Jamaica, while others said she was trying to ingratiate herself to Europeans by making a mockery of herself. Others argued that it would be disadvantageous to Jamaican music and culture to approve the use of profanities to facilitate flawed performances by one-dimensional artistes.

“Love of money is the root of all evil. Tell Spice to focus on improving her so called ‘talent’ and stop relying on her usual cheap gimmicks. She must realise that Belgium is a racist country and this’ b#@$#’ festival was never meant to celebrate the intelligence of Jamaicans. The organisers are promoting ignorance and illiteracy at our expense,” Holy Perry stated.

“Those words were used during a time when you would have horrible and disgusting men cursing or angrily reminding women about the most private and vulnerable point of her life when she often times feel ashamed or the monthly normal process of her life. Those words mostly centered around and about the female sexual anatomy and expressed in the crudest form of patois that existed of the day. How dare we try to celebrate this crudeness today as a part of ‘positive culture’?” another respondent wrote.

Some commenters declared that the artiste ought to use the indigenous curse words of the countries she visits, to test their legal system.

“When Spice goes on tour she need to find out the country bad word and say in on stage in their language and don’t see if them don’t lock her up,” Bulky Morris said.

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